Hurricane Preparedness

The traditional hurricane season is June 1 through November 30. It is time to make a plan and be ready. Here are a few resources for this year’s Hurricane Preparedness Week:

  • Know your risk – Hurricanes are not just a coastal problem. Impacts from wind and water can be felt many miles inland. Significant impacts can also occur regardless of the storm’s strength.
    • Consider your threats: Storm surges, flooding from heavy rain, strong winds, tornadoes, rip currents
    • Determine if you live in a flood-prone area
    • Find out if you live in an evacuation zone
  • Avoid having to rush through potentially life-saving preparations by getting your disaster supplies now. Supplies may not be available just before a storm arrives. Get an insurance review early, as flood insurance requires a 30-day waiting period.
    • Develop an evacuation plan
    • Assemble disaster supplies: food, water, batteries, charger, radio, cash
    • Get an insurance checkup and document your possessions
    • Create a communication plan with a hand-written list of contacts
    • Strengthen your home
  • Understand forecast information before a storm. This can tell you a lot about what is expected, including the storm’s path, rainfall amounts, wind speeds and more. Most importantly, it lets you and your family know what actions to take to prepare, monitor, shelter or evacuate. Visit www.hurricanes.gov for more information.
    • Rely on forecasts from your local National Weather Service office
    • Know your alerts and the difference between Watch and Warning
    • Focus on potential impacts, regardless of storm size and category
    • Know that deadly hazards occur well outside of the Forecast Cone
  • Know what to do during a storm. Whether you’ve evacuated or are sheltering in place, know what to expect from the hazards you may face. Remain vigilant, stay up-to-date with the latest forecasts and alerts, and continue to listen to local officials.
    • Protect your hone: Cover windows, secure doors and loose items
    • Determine sheltering options and consider your pets
    • Ready you go-bag, meds and supplies, charge phones, fill up/charge vehicle
    • Help your neighbors, especially the elderly and other vulnerable people
    • Follow evacuation orders if given
  • A key part of hurricane preparedness is understanding the dangers that remain well after a storm. This is not the time to put your guard down. Nearly half of hurricane fatalities occur after the storm.
    • Use caution after storms: If evacuated, only return home when directed it is safe to do so
    • Remain vigilant, as hazards remain: Heat, downed powerlines, floodwaters, etc.
    • Clean up safely: Don’t push yourself and check on neighbors
    • Only use generators outdoors, 20+ feet from your house
    • Prepare for the likelihood that help and communications may not be available
  • Do not wait to take action! Start preparing today!
    • Determine your risks from water and wind
    • Begin preparing now, before a storm
    • Learn how to understand hurricane forecasts and alerts
    • Learn what to do before, during and after a storm

Drought Contingency Plan

In order to conserve water during current drought conditions, the City of Houston has implemented Stage 1 of its Drought Contingency Plan.  During this stage, the North Mission Glen Municipal Utility District Board of Directors is requesting that all residents of the District take the following voluntary measures:

  • Check for and repair all leaks, dripping faucets, and running toilets.
  • Check sprinkler heads to make sure that water is not spraying into the street or directly into a storm drain.
  • Utilize water conservation measures such as displacement bags, low-flow shower heads, and leak detection tablets.
  • Limit irrigation to no more than two (2) days per week, between 7:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m.

Conservation in the Home

Start in the Bathroom

Did you know that about 75% of water used in the home is used in the bathroom? Look for ways to save water whenever possible. You’ll help Texas and reduce your water bill.

  • Bathing: Take a shower instead of a bath to save water. A short shower uses less water than a long one. A low-flow showerhead saves water by as much as 50% while still providing a refreshing, cleansing shower.
    Installing a low-flow showerhead is the single most effective conservation step that can be taken inside the home.
  • Toilet: Standard toilets manufactured prior to the 1980s usually require 5-7 gallons per flush.
    Toilets sold during the ‘80s and early ‘90s use 3.5 gallons per flush. The most significant savings come from replacing your toilet with a 1.6-gallon model. Since 1992 in Texas and 1994 nationally, new toilets must use 1.6 gallons or less per flush. Do not use a brick in your toilet tank. The brick will crumble and can damage the fixture.
  • Lavatory: Change your habits! Don’t let water run continuously while brushing your teeth, shaving or washing your hands. Additionally, a low-flow faucet aerator can save water use by up to 50%.

On to the kitchen for more savings…

About 8% of in-home water use takes place in the kitchen. And now for the Kitchen Sink –

  • Run water only when necessary.
  • Fill the basin or a dishpan to rinse dishes instead of using running water.
  • Soak pots and pans before washing.
  • Fill the basin or a pan with water to wash fruits and vegetables.
  • Keep a pitcher of water in the fridge rather than running tap water until it is cold enough to drink.
  • Operate the garbage disposal only when necessary.
Dishwasher Tips
  • Wash only full loads.
  • When you need to buy a new machine, take a look at the water-saving models. Newer models can cut water use by 25% and generally are no more expensive than non- conserving models.

All Around the House

  • Washing machines: Doing the laundry requires about 14% of water used inside the home.
  • Conserve by adjusting the water level to match the size of your loads.
  • Wash only full loads.

Pipes: Insulate hot water pipes where possible to avoid long delays and wasted water while waiting for the water to “run hot.”

Water Heater: Check the thermostat. Don’t have your water heater thermostat set too high. Settings higher than 125 degrees waste energy since the water must be mixed with cold water before use.

and most important…fix those leaks!
  • Leaks can account for 10% or more of the water bill. Leaks waste both water and energy.

Need proof? A toilet with a silent leak of one cup of water a minute – a mere dribble – wastes about 2,700 GALLONS OF WATER A MONTH. That’s not just water down the drain; that’s dollars down the drain. Your dollars.

Updated NFBWA Fees

Effective January 1, 2022, the new NFBWA pumpage fee will be $4.90 per 1,000 gallons of water delivered by the NFBWA.